Archive of ‘Ukrainian Dishes’ category

Pampushky (Ukrainian Doughnuts)

Claudia's Cookbook - Pampushky cover

I deemed this past Saturday “Deep Frying Day”. Claudia came over early, as we had a lot of Ukrainian cooking to do. All of which consisted of frying dough in hot oil. All of which was absolutely delicious. It had been quite a few years since I have had Pampushky. They are Ukrainian style doughnuts that are traditionally filled with either poppy seeds or prunes. (more…)

Perishke – Ukrainian Cottage Cheese Buns in Creamy Dill Sauce

Claudia's Cookbook - Ukrainian Cottage Cheese Buns with Creamy Dill Sauce cover

 There is nothing more comforting on a cold winter day than warm buns. You can interpret that however you like. I mean, whatever floats your boat, you silly animals. But right now, I’m talking about these dough buns above, otherwise known as “Perishke” in Ukrainian. Delicious, soft, warm cottage cheese filled buns smothered in creamy dill sauce. One bite and you will forget all about those other warm buns you were thinking about. (more…)

Ukrainian Beef-Filled Pyrizhky

Claudia's Cookbook - Ukrainian Beef Filled Pyrizhky cover

I bought a Christmas CD yesterday. It was the first CD I’ve purchased in legit 3 years. Of course it is filled with Christmas tunes from one of my favourite guilty pleasure TV shows, Nashville. With only a few weeks left until the holidays, I figured I should get into the spirit. Also, the most recent Christmas CD I had was Justin Bieber’s, so it was definitely time for an update.  (more…)

Ukrainian Christmas 2014…And a Tribute to Baba


Ukrainian Christmas is just around the corner – January 7 to be exact. My love of cooking, and ultimately this blog, was inspired by the two ladies that are in the photo above with me (I’m the one in the middle). The one on the left is Claudia, and the one on the right is my Baba, Claudia’s Mom. And yes, we’re wearing the same sweater but in different colours. This photo was taken almost 10 years ago on Christmas Eve. It is one of my favourite photos in the world. Claudia and Baba were cooking up a Ukrainian food storm in the kitchen and I was trying my best not to get in their way – hence why they are wearing the aprons and I’m not. Food, especially Ukrainian food, is such a big part of my life. A lot of the memories I have of growing up or the holidays has to do with Claudia and Baba cooking in the kitchen.

It gives me great pleasure that the most popular recipes on this blog are the ones that are Ukrainian. I also love hearing all the stories and comments that you, my followers, post here about your childhoods and how these recipes remind you of your family. It really does bring me to tears at times because this was truly a huge part of why I started this blog.

After a long and tough fight, we lost Baba this week. She was by far the strongest lady I have ever met in my entire life and I will miss her dearly. She left behind a legacy of love, humour, and most of all – zest for life and cooking. This post is dedicated to her and the delicious Ukrainian dishes she passed on to Claudia and to me.


Nothing beats Holopchi. I mean, nothing. They are the most amazing comfort food ever. Rice, ground beef, and onions all wrapped up in a cabbage leaf. Cabbage is healthy, right?

Find the recipe on our blog here —–>  Cabbage Rolls


My Baba used to stand in her kitchen and make dozens upon dozens of perogies in one day for coworkers, family and friends. Claudia makes a ton of different fillings for perogies. Some of our favourites are potato and cheese, sauerkraut, prune and raisin. Blueberry is also amazing as well.

Find the recipe on our blog here —–> Perogies


I actually eat more Borscht in the summer months than I do any other time of the year. Reason? Garden fresh beets make the most amazing Borscht in the world. I am so thankful for my parents huge garden in Saskatchewan where they plant tons of beets for this delicious soup.

Find the recipe on our blog here —–> Borscht


Dill, cheese and butter. I don’t think I need to say anything else. Nalysnyky is rich, savoury and dreamy. This was my very first recipe post on this blog! Again, total comfort food.

Find the recipe on our blog here —–> Nalysnyky 


The attachment that I have to Kutia is not because I love it. I actually don’t like it at all. It’s because my entire family adore this dish and rub it in my face every Christmas. Guilt trip central. I get such a kick out of it. This dish is very traditional and different. It’s almost like a sweet grain pudding. Tradition is that you eat this first before your other courses on Christmas.

Find the recipe on our blog here —–> Kutia


Pyrizhky are little balls of sunshine to me. The dough is so incredibly soft, and the sauerkraut has just the right amount of tang to cut the richness of the dough. I could eat a plateful of these any day of the week. They’re very addicting.

Find the recipe on our blog here —–> Pyrizhky

Enjoy and Kristos Razdayetsya!

Pyrizhky (Ukrainian Cabbage Buns)

Pyrizhky 29

I cannot believe that Christmas Eve is tomorrow. Where does the time go? I’m not gonna lie…I’m pretty darn excited. The copious amounts of delicious food, gift exchanges, and the celebration of family and friends is what I love most about this time of year.

Tomorrow, my family is having quite the Christmas Eve feast. Since we’re Ukrainian, we celebrate by having a huge dinner consisting of 12 meatless dishes. This year is the first in a long time where we will be having Pyrizhky, or cabbage buns. I never really grew up on these delectable little dough balls. My Baba, Grandma and Claudia never made them, so they were never a part of our Ukrainian feasts. This year, I decided to take some action and try to make them with Claudia. My soon to be Mother-in-Law was gracious enough to provide us with her recipe (and a bag full of samples!) to try. For our first attempt, they came out extremely well. This recipe makes approximately 13-14 dozen Pyrizhky. You can also use any other filling you desire, such as meat. However, we prefer sauerkraut.



This is by far Claudia’s favourite Ukrainian dish. Kutia is always served as the first of the twelve traditional meatless dishes during Christmas Eve. Served cold, Kutia is essentially a sweet wheat soup. I’m not going to lie. I don’t like this stuff at all. It has taken Claudia 32 years to get me on board with Kutia and she has yet to succeed. Every Christmas Eve it’s the same discussion:

Claudia: “Jaime, look it’s your favourite – I can’t wait for you to try some Kutia. It’s so good”

Jaime: “No.”

Claudia: “On come ON! It’s so good! You’re Ukrainian, it’s part of your heritage.”

Jaime: “No.”

Don’t get me wrong, everyone else I know loves this stuff. But for some strange reason (probably my stubbornness) I skip this and go straight for the Borsch. It really is amazing that I am still invited over for Christmas every year with my behaviour. So please, do not take my word on how delicious this traditional dish is. If you ask 99.9% of Ukrainians, they love it. I have always had a unique side to me.


Ukrainian Christmas

Ukrainian Orthodox Christmas is celebrated on January 7. It is tradition that on Christmas Eve (or “Sviaty Vechir”) 12 meatless dishes are prepared as it mimics the Nativity Fast, which no meat, eggs or milk (including cheese) are allowed during the supper. Only fish, mushrooms and various types of grain are allowed as the main offerings.

In our family, we cheat on the cheese, milk and eggs content of our Christmas Eve dinner but still abide by the “no meat” rule with the exception of fish. We have previously blogged about four traditional Ukrainian dishes that we always have on Christmas Eve and would like to highlight them again.

Top left: Perogies – We posted these the week of Christmas and they are by far the most commonly made traditional recipe in Claudia’s cookbook. They can be made with many different filling selections are are by far my ultimate comfort food.

Top right: Borsch – This “Beet Soup” can be made with meat or meatless. I have always preferred the vegetarian variety. It’s hearty, warm and perfect for those winter evenings

Bottom left: Holopchi – Better known as “Cabbage Rolls”, these little darlings are can also be made with or without bits of ground beef in them. Sticky rice wrapped in a steamed cabbage leaf,  topped with tomato soup, butter and onions. You simply cannot go wrong with this recipe.

Bottom right: Nalysnyky – Delicious Ukrainian-style cheese crepes which are super savoury and rich. This was our very first blog post which makes the recipe near and dear to my heart.

Stay tuned to our blog as we soon celebrate Ukrainian Christmas and share with you yet another traditional recipe. One hint – it’s Claudia’s absolute favourite!


Today is my Baba’s (Claudia’s Mom) 82nd birthday. There really isn’t a better way to celebrate her life (and Claudia’s essentially) than to post the staple of my Ukrainian childhood (and the best food she ever made) on this day. That being perogies. No one, and I do mean no one, can ever top my Baba’s perogies. They are simply the best. I know there are a lot of you who say the same thing about your own family recipe. But I kid you not, my Baba made and sold hundreds (if not thousands) of dozens of these little nuggets of gold for people just like yourselves after they realized they did not have the best family recipe. Trust me on this one. I grew up on this stuff after all!

Claudia and I spent all Saturday afternoon perfecting the dough and creating dozens of differently filled perogies. We finally came up with what we thought Baba would deem as worthy to share with friends. Perogies are the ultimate comfort food. I have never grown tired of them. My hope is that after trying these for yourself, you won’t either.


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